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Think&Drink with Philosopher Scott Samuelson and guest You Betcha Guy, Myles Montplaisir

Think & Drinks bring curious people together to connect, question, and learn. Join us at Brewhalla for a moderated scholar presentation with Philosopher Scott Samuelson and guest You Betcha Guy, Myles Montplaisir!

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Time & Location

LOCATION

In-person

DAY OF THE WEEK

Sunday

TIME OF DAY

Daytime

About the Event

About this event:

Sunday, March 10

2-4 pm CT

The Odditorium (event space on Brewhalla's second floor)

Must be 21+


🍺  Scott Samuelson, author of Rome as a Guide to the Good Life: A Philosophical Grand Tour, will draw inspirations from Ancient Roman philosophy and speak about what a good life is - the Midwestern way. From Raphael to food to architecture, discover what Romans called the vita beata or the “good life” in this Think&Drink with guest You Betcha Guy, Myles Montplaisir.



About the Speakers:

Scott Samuelson lives in Ames, Iowa, where he holds a joint position at Iowa State University in Philosophy & Religious Studies and Extension & Outreach. He has taught the humanities in universities, colleges, prisons, houses of worship, and bars. He has also worked as a movie reviewer, television host, and sous-chef at a French restaurant down a gravel road. He is the author of The Deepest Human Life, Seven Ways of Looking at Pointless Suffering and Rome as a Guide to the Good Life: A Philosophical Grand Tour.


Myles Montplaisir, known to netizens as You Betcha Guy, is the face behind You Betcha. You Betcha is a Midwest based entertainment company that celebrates Busch Light, blue collar people, construction workers, and all things midwestern.



🎟  Ticket includes a 12oz Drekker beer and appetizers!



Hosted by Humanities North Dakota and Brewhalla.

Humanities North Dakota classes and events are funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.



HND VALUE STATEMENT

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Humanities North Dakota. However, in an increasingly polarized world, we at Humanities North Dakota believe that being open-minded is necessary to thinking critically and rationally. Therefore our programs and classes reflect our own open-mindedness in the inquiry, seeking, and acquiring of scholars to speak at our events and teach classes for our Public University. To that end, we encourage our participants to join us in stepping outside our comfort zones and considering other perspectives and ideas by being open-minded while attending HND events featuring scholars who hold a variety of opinions, some being opposite of our own held beliefs.



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